Homemade Remedies for Deer Control

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This article will teach you how to make a homemade remedy for deer control.
by Brooks Wilson · All Zones · Animals and Rodents · 4 Comments · June 28, 2010 · 5,712 views

Deer In YardThe average deer eats about 5 pounds of greenery each day. Creatures of habit, they revisit the same forage areas often. There are several ways to go about deer control. Below are some methods worth trying.

Homemade Remedies for Deer Control

The following non-toxic recipe will deter the deer, but may need to be re-applied after a heavy rain.

  • Mix one whole egg with a quarter cup of water and mix well. Pour the mixture into a pump bottle and spray it on your plants. This deterrent will withstand light rains because the egg sticks to the leaves.
  • Mix one tablespoon of liquid dish detergent with one ounce of hot sauce in one litre of water and spray directly on plants which deer have been nibbling.

For larger volume applications, mix the following ingredients:

  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 gallons water
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 2 Tbsp cooking oil
  • 2 Tbsp liquid detergent

Pour the mixture into a pump bottle and spray it on your plants.


Other Ideas...some strange...but they work!


Zest Soap: A bar of Zest soap in a knee-high nylon stocking hung on a branch or bush keeps deer from eating your plant.

Hair Samples: Ask your local hair salon or barber shop to save the cut hair they sweep off the floor every evening. Spread these hair clippings around plants deer eat.

Country Leaks: If you live out in the middle of nowhere, where "country leaks" will go unnoticed, stop using the toilet and simply urinate all around the plants that deer like to eat. Sounds crazy, but it works! Note: Watch out for mosquitos:-)

Plants: Bog Salvia (Salvia uliginosa) and Lantana plants do a great job repelling deer. These plants have a particular smell that deer hate!

Store-bought Deer Repellent

Nontoxic natural deer repellents are commercially available, using variations of the above formulas.

Brooks Wilson

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Brooks Wilson - Brooks is one of the founders of Gardenality and a nurseryman since 1989.


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Deer Repellent


Sandy McGinnis

Sandy McGinnis · Gardenality Bloom · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
"Country Leaks" do work. My husband leaks on the fence posts around the veggie garden every spring and summer. He will also put on an old T shirt while working in the garden and when he is done for the day hangs the shirt in the garden with his sweaty sent all over it for the wind to blow across the garden.

3 years ago ·
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John Heider

John Heider · Gardenality Genius · Zone 9B · 25° to 30° F
Great ideas and really inexpensive. The Scarecrow motion sensing sprinklers work well for me on raccoons. I'm told it works well also on deer.

2 years ago ·
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Nikki Cline

Nikki Cline · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
I made a concoction of garlic, wasabi, and Axe brand body wash...basically I found the strongest "stinky stuff" I had around the house! I ran the garlic in the blender with some ice to get it into a liquidy state, mixed the whole mess together with water in a 2 gallon garden sprayer and hosed down the mulch in all the islands. I then replanted what the deer had munched down to the ground and had no more trouble with them. I think I will likely do the same this spring.

2 years ago ·
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Musetta

Musetta · Gardenality Bloom · Zone 4B · -25° to -20° F
I have personally used the spreading of hair around plants - amazingly animals generally don't like the scent or the hair! The soap and egg mixture which someone listed previously on a response works wonders. I also use a motion sensor sprinkler on the corners of the garden and a Japanese Deer Scarer in one area where animals have attempted to destroy my plants. The shishi Odoshi or "deer scarer" was originally used by Japanese farmers to scare off deer and other animals from their rice fields - . As the water flows from the "Kakehi" or bamboo water spout into the end of the shishi-odoshi the pivoted length of bamboo is tipped forward and the water runs out and then falls back onto a stone to create the "knocking or clacking noise". I used a pre-formed plastic pool and a pump - not too expensive - and landscaped around it. Good luck!

2 years ago ·
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