Planting a Container Grown Rose

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This article will teach you the different methods of planting roses.
by Gary Mueller · Zone 3A · -40° to -35° F to Zone 11 · Above 40° F · Planting · 0 Comments · August 25, 2010 · 4,692 views

There are many different types of roses. Hybrid tea, grandiflora, climbing, running, and modern shrub roses such as the Knock Out Roses are among a few types. Regardless of what type rose you are planting, there are basic planting techniques that, when followed, will greatly enhance your ability to grow healthy roses.

Where to plant roses?
Before planting your rose, you'll want to choose a good location. A sunny area of the garden that gets at least 4 to 5 hours of sun is best. Morning sun is a must as it will dry dew from the leaves that might otherwise lead to the onset of damaging fungus and other diseases. In warmer climates such as the Southern US, most roses will appreciate some shade during the hottest part of summer afternoons. Also make sure that the soil in the planting area is well-drained.

TOP: If you are planting several roses in a group, avoid crowding them too close together. Overcrowding can trap heat and humidity that can lead to disease. When spacing, check to see how wide the variety of rose grows to at maturity and allow for a couple feet or so between plants. This allows for walking space and gives the roses room to breathe.

How To Plant Roses


Planting Container Grown Roses In The Garden

Container-grown roses can be planted any time of year in the garden.
Planting Roses
STEP 1 - To plant a container grown rose, dig a hole at least 18" deep and 12" wider than the container the rose was growing in. This will give the roots plenty of room to start growing through amended soil.
STEP 2 - After you dig the planting hole, fill it half way with water and let the water soak in. The water should empty the hole within an hour, and if not, dig the hole a few inches deeper. You want to insure there will be adequate drainage because roses will not tolerate wet feet. Constantly wet soil causes decline of the plant and eventually leads to root rot and death.
STEP 3 - After digging the hole for your rose, I mix in the following to the soil removed from the planting hole:
(NOTE: You can use your own recipe for a planting mix if you like)

  • One shovel full of peat moss
  • One shovel full of composted cow manure
  • One shovel full of compost such as mushroom compost (or some other for of compost)
  • One cup of cottonseed meal
  • One cup of bone meal
  • One tablespoon of Epsom salts

STEP 4 - If you are planting a grafted rose, before placing the root ball in the hole, backfill hole with soil mixture to a level where the crown, or bud union (where the plant was grafted), will be 1 inch below ground level. Always bury the bud union on a grafted rose. Non-grafted roses can be planted with the top of the root ball level with the ground. Burying the bud union/graft helps to prevent wind damage. If the bud union is too far out of the ground, wind can continually rock the plant back and forth loosening the soil and tearing roots at the surface. This will impair the roses ability to take up nutrients and water and eventually the plant can topple over or break off.
STEP 5 - When you have the level right, hold the rose steady and straight and begin to fill hole with the backfill soil mixture, tamping lightly as you go to remove air pockets. Stop backfilling at a point 3/4 from the top of the hole. Add water to settle and remove any air pockets. Then add some fish emulsion for an extra boost. Follow instructions on the product label. Finish backfilling.
STEP 6 - Build a 2-inch high catch basin to help retain water during the first season by mounding a ring of soil in a circle around the perimeter of the hole.

Go to next page for instructions for planting Bare Root roses...

Gary Mueller

Meet The Author

Gary Mueller - Gary Mueller is an award-winning grower of hybrid tea and other roses.


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Keywords

Roses, Planting, Containers, Soil




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