The Need For Mason Bees

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This article provides information about the need for Mason Bees to pollinate our crops and our gardens
by Brett · All Zones · Insects · 5 Comments · December 21, 2011 · 5,367 views

The gentle Mason Bees don't sting!Today, while the honey bees are still viable with large numbers, orchard managers are able to pollinate their crops with no concerns to the future. But, in the future, North America will need billions of mason bees as the honey bee continues to decline in numbers and everyone from orchard managers to backyard gardeners will have fewer bees to pollinate our fruit-bearing plants and trees. Basically speaking, no bees, no food.

Today, the backyard gardener holds the key to the future success of “putting food on our plates” - Dave Hunter, President of The Orchard Bee Association

When orchard managers, farmers and gardeners begin looking for an alternate pollinator to the honey bee, there won’t be enough, unless:

The backyard gardeners are coordinated and actively raising the mason bees years in advance.

That's where our friend Dave Hunter, president of the Orchard Bee Association, comes into the picture.

Many of you may have heard about the challenges the honey bees are facing. In order to raise more awareness about these challenges, and to educate gardeners on how we can participate in increasing populations of other types of pollinating bees, specifically Mason Bees, Dave launched CrownBees.com and Bee-Mail.

Mason Bees are very friendly, gentle bees. The males have no stinger. The females can sting but really have to be in personal jeopardy to do so. If caught in clothing or pinched between fingers, then yes, they might sting. The venom is very mild and generally produces little long term pain or swelling.

We, the founders of Gardenality, hope the information provided in CrownBees.com will encourage you to get involved and start taking action to increase pollinator bee populations. Doing so will not only help local orchards and farmers but will also increase the amount of produce and the number of flowers you produce in your own back yard!

Each section of the Crown Bees website was written in mind so that you will hopefully think through your own personal involvement in Crown Bees program. It's not an expensive endeavor, it's totally safe, and the benefits are rewarding and priceless to you, your children and everyone!

Through the CrownBees.com website you can sign up for Bee-Mail. It is a small e-newsletter that will provide reminders about the various steps to take throughout the year to raise your own Mason Bees. You’ll receive a newsletter roughly each month to help you succeed.

If raising Mason Bees to produce more produce and flowers sounds interesting to you, and you would like to join me and the many other gardeners all over America who are participating in the Crown Bees program, click here to get started.



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Dave Hunter

Dave Hunter · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Brent,

I believe you took notes in our conversation? I couldn't have said this any better. To elaborate on the backyard gardener's future role...

- Crown Bees is designed to help the gardener be successful raising mason bees. It's very easy, especially with our reminder Bee-Mail helping them know when to do what. In future years, we hope that They give their excess mason bees (in cocoon form in the winter) to friends and family. In 5-6 years, we'll trade mason bee tubes for their excess mason bees. These excess mason bees will be used in regional commercial orchards the following spring. ...thus, their mason bees will provide apples/cherries/pears/blueberries to farmers who will then be able to sell them produce.

Scientists that I work with are extremely concerned that our star performing pollinator, the honey bee, will continue to be challenged. Using mason bees to help them with their pollination (both bees on the same field) will buffer some of the challenge.

A coordinated, well thought through organization, will be imparative. Crown Bees is up to the challenge, but will be only one company of many in the future role. We're here to collaborate with all companies, orchard managers, and pollinators in Orchard Bee Association.

I'm very grateful to be partnering with a leader in the online gardening community. Our relationship will continue to be vital!

Dave

7 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Dave - I knew only a little about the pollinator challenges and you definitely helped bring me up to date. I and the others on Team Gardenality are looking forward to collaborating with your organization to bring about more awareness and hopefully participation in your Bee Mail program and in raising Mason Bees. I just recently signed up for Bee Mail and can't wait to get started raising them myself...with your help of course!

7 years ago ·
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Victoria Blocker

Victoria Blocker · Gardenality Stem · Zone 9B · 25° to 30° F
This is one of the many reasons I love Gardenality. I'll definitely check out CrownBees.com, and pass this article along.

6 years ago ·
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Dave Hunter

Dave Hunter · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Thanks Victoria! You'll also find we're becoming more active in facebook as well. Helping each gardener learn more is becoming easier through great sites gardenality.

6 years ago ·
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Victoria Blocker

Victoria Blocker · Gardenality Stem · Zone 9B · 25° to 30° F
Thanks Dave. I'll check you guys out there too. I signed up for Bee-Mail!

6 years ago ·
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