Butterscotch Jasmine -

(Gelsemium sempervirens 'Butterscotch')

Vine Plants


Other Common Names: Yellow Jasmine, Jessamine, Jasmine Vine
Family: Loganiaceae Genus: Gelsemium Species: sempervirens Cultivar: 'Butterscotch'
Butterscotch JasmineButterscotch JasmineButterscotch JasmineButterscotch JasmineButterscotch Jasmine
Gardenality.com Planted · 7 years ago
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Butterscotch Jasmine Overview

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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Planting
I have Butterscotch Jasmine growing in two spots in my yard. One along a chain link fence where the soil is well-drained and dry, the other is growing over a well-house in soil that is well-drained but stays damp, mostly because its planted right behind a flowerbed that receives regular watering. Regarding sun exposure, I'd recommend a location that provides at least 6 hours of sun a day, though I've seen this one growing with less sunlight. I just think it will bloom heavier with more sun.

To plant, dig a hole no deeper than the root ball and two to three times the width of the root ball. If the soil stays consistently soggy, you might want to plant it in a raised mound to avoid roots standing in too much water. After digging the hole, turn and break up the soil removed from the planting hole. If the native soil is compacted or heavy clay amend with organic compost or a good soil amendment at a 50/50 ratio. Remove your plant from its container and carefully but firmly loosen the root ball. Set the plant into the hole you've prepared, making sure the top of the root ball is slightly above the soil level. Pull your backfill soil mixture around the root ball in the hole, tamping as you go to remove air pockets. Then water thoroughly and cover with a one to two-inch layer of mulch.

6 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Pruning
Butterscotch Jasmine doesn't require pruning. However, it can be pruned occasionally to control the form or to keep in bounds. Pruning would best be done after the plant has flowered in early spring and again after it has flowered in fall.

6 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Feeding
To keep the foliage nice and dark green, I fertilize Butterscotch Jasmine after it blooms in spring and again in late summer or early fall with a well-balanced, slow-release plant food that contains iron and/or sulfur for deep greening. I'd recommend ceasing fertilization 2 months prior to the typical first frost date in your area.

6 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Problems
I've seen no serious insect or disease problems with this native vine.

6 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Butterscotch Jasmine, like it's cousin Carolina Jasmine, is a fast growing evergreen climbing vine that produces masses of fragrant, golden-yellow trumpet flowers in early spring. Difference is, Butterscotch Jasmine will bloom again in fall. Some folks say it's blooms for them spring through fall. I have two of these vines planted in my landscape. One is growing over a well house and the other along a chain link fence. Both are doing very well now for several years. This vine is great for use to grow along a fence, on trellises, up posts or poles, along railings, up a gutter down spout, up and over arbors and pergolas, on the mailbox, and almost any other structure you can think of that it will climb. Our landscape design-build firm uses this vine more than any other here in the mid-Georgia area. It's very easy to grow, and when planted given room to grow, is very low maintenance.

6 years ago ·
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