Cape Jasmine -

(Gardenia jasminoides 'Radicans')

Shrubs


Other Common Names: Creeping Gardenia, Dwarf Gardenia, Trailing Gardenia, Gardenia Radicans
Family: Rubiaceae Genus: Gardenia Species: jasminoides Cultivar: 'Radicans'
Creeping GardeniaCreeping Gardenia
Brent Wilson Planted · 6 years ago
Top Plant File Care Takers:
Brent Wilson · 10 Edits
Gloria Askins · 5 Edits

Cape Jasmine Overview

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Caron Smed

Caron Smed · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
I grew gardenias in Atlanta, Georgia on the south side of the house protected beside the porch. They were the Veittchi variety and grew to be 4 feet high. They were beautiful and survived the winter snow there. I loved them and the blooms smelled musky and amazing. I used the blooms to make Grad wrist bands for my daughter. Highly recommend giving gardenias a try. Bought one for Kelowna BC and waiting for the blooms to break out.
Also want to choose some for propagating. Easy to do but not tried before.

6 months, 2 weeks ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Planting
Creeping gardenia performs best in sites that provide well-drained soil and full to mostly sun, however they will tolerate a fair amount of shade. In colder regions, plant gardenias where they will have protection from severe winter winds, such as the east or south side of a home, building or other structure. Since gardenias are highly fragrant consider planting them near windows or outdoor living areas such as decks, patios, and porches, where their fragrance can be enjoyed.

To plant, dig a hole no deeper than the root ball and two to three times the width of the root ball and fill it with water. If the hole drains within a few hours, you have good drainage. If the water is still standing 12 hours later, improve the drainage in your bed, perhaps by establishing a raised bed. Turn and break up the soil removed from the planting hole. Mix some organic compost if the native soil is clay or compacted soil. Remove your plant from its container and carefully but firmly loosen the root ball. Set the plant into the hole you've prepared, making sure the top of the root ball is slightly above the soil level. Pull your backfill soil mixture around the root ball in the hole, tamping as you go to remove air pockets. Then water thoroughly and cover with a one to two-inch layer of mulch

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Pruning
Gardenias do not require pruning though they respond well to it. Prune as desired after the plants have bloomed. Older gardenias that have become spindly respond very well to rejuvenation pruning, which involves cutting the plant back to short stumps.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Feeding
Gardenias prefer an acid soil with a pH in the range of 4.5 to 6. I fertilize gardenias after they've bloomed with a well-balanced shrub & tree type fertilizer that includes a micronutrient package containing iron and/or sulfur. If the foliage on your gardenia develop chlorosis (yellowing of leaves) due to soil that is too alkaline you can apply additional amounts of chelated iron and/or soil sulfur to lower soil pH, making it more acidic.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Problems
The two problems I've seen with gardenias involve insects and damage from severe cold. In areas that experience cold temperatures, plant gardenias where they will receive some protection from sever cold winds, such as on the east or south side of a home, building or other structure. On occasion, gardenias can be visited by honeydew aphids or whiteflies. Honeydew aphids usually come in late summer and don't hang around too long. They don't do much damage but leave a sticky residue on the leaf that turns black over time. Aphids can be controlled with neem oil or malathion spray. To control whiteflies, spray with malathion and then again in 72 hours to eliminate hatchlings. When spraying any chemical always read and follow instructions on the product label.

2 years ago ·
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Spencer Young

Spencer Young · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Pruning
Gardenias requires no pruning. To Maintain shape prune in late Winter before new growth emerges. Cut with hand pruners and not powered trimmers to avoid scarring leaves.

3 years ago ·
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DEBBIE KAYLOR

DEBBIE KAYLOR · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
I AM WONDERING IF I CAN GROW CREEPING GARDENIAS IN NASHVILLE,TN AREA.....

1 year ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Hi Debbie - Creeping Gardenia are only cold hardy up to Zone 8a. Nashville is Zone 6b so too far north to grow gardenia year round outdoors. That being said, you can grow gardenias in containers that can be brought indoors during the winter months. This being said, if you can find the 'Crown Jewel' Gardenia it is said by some to be hardy in Zone 6b. Also, I have a 'Fall In Love' Gardenia that has shown very good resistance to cold temps. Not sure if it would be hardy in Nashville but might be worth a try.

1 year ago ·
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Gloria Askins

Gloria Askins · Gardenality Bud · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Radicans (creeping) Gardenia grows very successfully in northern SC and at least as far north as Charlotte NC which covers Zone 7 a & b. I have several in my garden in Greenville SC. We did get some leaf damage this winter because it was an extra harsh year but the new leaves came out quickly and you could not tell there was any problem by the beginning of May.

6 months, 1 week ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Problems
That's good to hear, Gloria. A lot of whether or not a specific variety of gardenia will be hardy in a specific area depends on several factors including soil type and soil moisture, mulch, and location in the garden, which can either serve to protect or expose plants from the harsh elements. For instance, we had folks here in Zone 8A of mid Georgia who lost their Gardenia radicans this past winter because the plants were growing in a location that exposed them to the harsh winds and abnormal low temperatures. The Gardenia radicans in my own landscape did okay, but they are growing on the east side of my home, which gave them radiant heat and protection from the wind. Too, I apply an extra layer of mulch around the plants for insulation.

6 months, 1 week ago ·
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