Harlequin Glory Bower -

(Clerodendrum trichotomum)

Trees


Family: Verbenaceae Genus: Clerodendrum Species: trichotomum
Harlequin Glory BowerHarlequin Glory BowerHarlequin Glory BowerHarlequin Glory BowerHarlequin Glory Bower
Tina Lenox Planted · 3 years ago
Top Plant File Care Takers:
Tina Lenox · 73 Edits

Harlequin Glory Bower Overview

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Harlequin Glory Bower In Member Gardens


Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Harlequin Glory Bower is a large shrub or small tree that produces wonderfully fragrant flowers in summer that are very attractive to butterflies. Unique berries form after blooms.

3 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Pruning
I have a Harlequin Glory Bower growing in my landscape. Planted it two years ago. It is doing remarkably well and so far I have yet to prune it. It's forming a somewhat dense tree all on its own and I provided enough room for it to grow naturally to it's mature size without interfering with other plants and trees growing nearby. This tree or large shrub grows from about 15 to 20 feet in width to about the same in height, but can be kept smaller with yearly pruning. I'll continue to let mine grow naturally as long at it keeps a nice shape.

If you do need to prune your Harlequin Glory Bower, I would suggest doing so in late winter or early spring, before new growth begins to emerge. You can prune it to be a small tree or a large shrub. Mine is a single stem tree. To form a tree simply remove lower branches emerging from the main trunk(s). To maintain it as a shrub, or to prune the canopy of a tree-form, maybe cut it back by a foot or so each season. I usually trace back from an outer stem to a point where the stem intersects a larger branch and make a cut 6 to 12 inches above the intersection. This plant has a tendency to send up suckers from the base of the trunk. These can be removed any time of year.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Planting
Regarding planting a Harlequin Glory Bower, I would suggest a location with full sun to partial shade. Mine is growing great in morning sun with some shade starting about mid-afternoon. For best results, you want the soil to be rich, well-drained, and loamy.

If your soil is heavy clay or very dense, I would suggest digging the planting hole maybe two feet wide or more and not much deeper than the rootball. Then add and thoroughly mix in organic matter, such as mushroom compost or composted manure, at a 50/50 ratio with the soil removed from the planting hole. If the soil is not so dense and of better quality maybe a 25/75 ratio.

Set the plant in the planting hole with the top of the rootball level with the ground. As you backfill around the rootball with your soil mixture tamp as you go to remove air pockets.

After planting, water deeply and then as needed to keep soil damp but not wet or soggy. Apply a one- to two-inch layer of shredded wood mulch or pine straw around the plant.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Feeding
I fertilize my Glory Bower with a well-balanced all-purpose plant food in early spring.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Problems
I've seen no serious pest or disease problems with Harlequin Glory Bower. Suckers might emerge from the base. These can simply be removed.

2 years ago ·
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