Russian 26 Pomegranate -

(Punica granatum 'Russian 26')

Fruit Bushes


Other Common Names: Edible Pomegranate, Granate Apple
Family: Punicaceae Genus: Punica Species: granatum Cultivar: 'Russian 26'
Russian 26 PomegranateRussian 26 PomegranateRussian 26 Pomegranate
Brent Wilson Planted · 3 years ago
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Brent Wilson · 72 Edits

Russian 26 Pomegranate Overview

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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Planting
Though Russian 26 is the most cost hardy Pomegranate, the ideal site to plant one will offer full sun and an eastern or southern exposure alongside a home, wall or other structure to provide protection from prevailing winds and late frosts during winter. Pomegranate will grow in average soil mixed with compost, but do not add manure-based soil amendments. Pomegranate are not heavy feeders, and over fertilization results in lush leaf growth at the expense of fruit production.

To plant a pomegranate, dig a hole no deeper than the root ball and two to three times the width of the root ball and fill it with water. If the hole drains within a few hours, you have good drainage. If the water is still standing 12 hours later, improve the drainage in your bed, perhaps by establishing a raised bed or mound. Turn and break up the soil removed from the planting hole. If the native soil is dense, compacted or heavy clay mix in a good organic compost or soil amendment at a 30/70 ratio with the soil removed from the hole. Remove your plant from its container and carefully but firmly loosen the roots around the exterior of the root ball. Set the plant into the hole you've prepared, making sure the top of the root ball is slightly above the soil level to allow for settling. Pull your backfill soil mixture around the root ball in the hole, tamping as you go to remove air pockets. Then water thoroughly and cover with a one to two-inch layer of mulch.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Feeding
After planting, and new growth begins in Spring, and rain or irrigation settles the soil, apply a granulated organic fertilizer or ammonium sulphate. Generally, two cups of fertilizer a year split into 3 to 4 applications should be sufficient, or follow rates recommended on label. Spread the fertilizer evenly over a circle 18" in diameter with the pomegranate plant in the center. Repeat this same fertilization process in March and July of the second year spreading twice as much fertilizer as the year before over a circle 24" in diameter with the pomegranate plant in the center. Continue to increase the amount of fertilizer applied yearly until the bushes are 8-10 feet tall. Spread the fertilizer evenly under and around the bushes. Water the plants throughout the growing season when rainfall is not adequate. Irrigation of young plants is especially important during the first season or two. Always keep a sufficient layer of much around your pomegranate to control competition from weeds.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Pruning
Pomegrantes can be grown naturally as a large bush or limbed up into a small tree.

Because pomegranate suckers profusely from the crown, frequent sucker removal will be necessary to train the plant into a tree form, as is popularly done.

To develop a single or 2 to 3-stem trunk, the process must be started soon after planting. Choose 1 to 3 trunks you would like to keep and remove the rest. If you're lucky, you might find a 1 to 3-trunk already established at a local nursery and garden center.

Annual pruning of bearing pomegranates is not really necessary - but dead or damaged portions should be removed as time permits, and some thinning of suckers or branches may be necessary from time to time. As your pomegranate plant matures, continue with the same care as practiced during establishment, whether tree-form or natural shrub.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Problems
I haven't seen any serious insect or disease problems with the Russian Pomegranate...not sure if deer will eat them? Even though Russian 26 is the most cold hardy pomegranate, in colder regions plant it in an eastern or southern exposure alongside a home, wall or other structure to provide protection from prevailing winds and late frosts during winter. An extra layer of shredded wood or straw mulch can help protect roots in case of a severe deep freeze.

2 years ago ·
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