Aruba Red Daylily -

(Hemerocallis 'Aruba Red')

Perennial Plants


Other Common Names: Daylily
Family: Hemerocallidaceae Genus: Hemerocallis Cultivar: 'Aruba Red'
Aruba Red Daylily
Brent Wilson Planted · 2 years ago
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Brent Wilson · 83 Edits

Aruba Red Daylily Overview

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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Planting
Plant daylilies in sites that provide well-drained soil and plenty of sun. Aruba Red is a strong growing daylily that blooms continuously throughout three seasons: spring, summer and fall. It is a lower-growing daylily (14-18 inches tall) that is useful planted as a border along walkways or paths, as a groundcover on slopes or embankments, or in small to large groups in landscape beds or perennial gardens.

To plant, dig a hole no deeper and at least two times the width of the root ball and fill it with water. If the hole drains within a few hours, you have good drainage. If the water is still standing 6 hours later, improve the drainage in your bed, perhaps by establishing a raised bed.

Turn and break up the soil removed from the planting hole. If the native soil is dense, compacted or heavy clay, mix in a good organic compost or soil amendment at a 50/50 ratio with the soil removed from the planting hole.

Remove your plant from its container and carefully but firmly loosen the root ball. Set the plant into the hole you've prepared, making sure the top of the root ball is slightly above the soil level.

Pull your backfill soil mixture around the root ball in the hole, tamping as you go to remove air pockets.

Water thoroughly and cover with a one to two-inch layer of mulch.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
The Aruba Red Daylily is a strong growing, early blooming daylily that blooms continuously throughout three seasons. It features big, 4 inch showy dark red flowers on compact plants. It is a very vigorous grower producing compact plants with grassy foliage, and double or triple the number of flower stalks and offsets each year.

Aruba Red™ is useful in perennial borders, massed for erosion control on slopes, or in small to large groups in landscape beds as a color accent.

The compact plants are highly rust resistant and the flowers are self-cleaning; old blooms are cleanly shed. It is cold hardy to -10 to -20° F. (Zone 5 - 9); enjoys full sun exposure and has wide tolerance of soil types and moisture levels. Grown in loam, sand, silt, or clay soils.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Pruning
Daylilies do not require pruning however if you remove the spent flower scapes (flower stems) it will promote heavier flowering. When plants go dormant for winter dead foliage can be removed.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Feeding
I fertilize dayilies with a flower food in spring and again in late summer. Cease fertilizing at a point two months prior to the typical first frost date in your area.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Problems
Aruba Red Daylily is highly resistant to rust and has no serious insect problems. Consistently wet soil can cause problems with the roots.

2 years ago ·
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