Don's Variegated Rhododendron -

(Rhododendron austrinum 'Dons Variegated')

Shrubs


Other Common Names: Orange Rhododendron, Native Azalea, Honeysuckle Azalea, Florida Azalea , Orange Azalea
Family: Ericaceae Genus: Rhododendron Species: austrinum Cultivar: 'Dons Variegated'
Don's Variegated RhododendronDon's Variegated RhododendronDon's Variegated Rhododendron
Brent Wilson Planted · 2 years ago
Top Plant File Care Takers:
Brent Wilson · 75 Edits

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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Planting
I recommend planting rhododendron/native zaleas in sites that provide well-drained, but moist fertile soil and mostly shade to morning sun with afternoon shade. Native azalealeas do not like dense, compacted or consistently wet soils. Like evergreen azaleas, native azaleas prefer a slightly acid to acid soil.

When planting native azaleas in well-drained, loose, fertile soil I usually add just a few handfuls of organic matter or compost to the backfill mix and plant with the top edge of the rootball even with or slightly above ground level.

When planting native azaleas in clay or compacted soil, I always dig the planting hole about three times the width of the root ball and add in mushroom compost, or some other form of organic matter, to the native soil removed from the planting hole at a 50/50 ratio. If the ground is level, I always plant native azaleas with the top edge of the root ball about an inch or so above ground level, then taper the backfill soil mixture from the top edge of the root ball gradually to existing grade. To capture additional water during the first year, I usually use any left over soil to build a low water retention ring about an inch or two high around the planting hole. Mulch with a 2 inch layer of pine straw or shredded wood mulch.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Pruning
Native azaleas do not require pruning. Though you can prune them if needed. Stray and broken branches can be pruned any time of year.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Feeding
I fertilize native azaleas after they bloom in spring with a well-balanced shrub and tree type fertilizer that contains iron and/or sulfur or with a natural or organic plant food.

2 years ago ·
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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Problems
I've seen very few if any serious insect or disease problems with native azaleas / rhododendrons.

2 years ago ·
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