Murray Cypress -

(Cupressus leylandii 'Murray')

Trees


Other Common Names: Murray Leyland Cypress, Murray Leyland, Murray X Cypress
Family: Cupressaceae Genus: Cupressus Species: leylandii Cultivar: 'Murray'
Murray Leyland Cypress
Heather McQuistion Planted · 1 year ago
Top Plant File Care Takers:
John Heider · 71 Edits
Heather McQuistion · 8 Edits

Murray Cypress Overview

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John Heider

John Heider · Gardenality Genius · Zone 9B · 25° to 30° F
Murray Cypresses well as both privacy fences and Christmas trees. This hybrid is similar to the Leyland Cypress but grows at a faster rate, has stronger limbs than the Leyland a finer texture and is more resistant to fungus. Its stronger branches will stand up to snow, ice, and wind and will not drop its unique foliage in even the harshest of weather. Its strong root system allows it to tolerate virtually any growing condition, including wet soil and hot, humid climates. Adapts well to various soil and sun conditions.

1 year ago ·
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John Heider

John Heider · Gardenality Genius · Zone 9B · 25° to 30° F · Comment About Pruning
Shearing is an excellent way to control the trees size. For a formal hedge you can start shearing when the tree reaches 3 or 4 feet in height. Shear only the sides, remove no more than 3 or 4 inches of growth. This will cause the tree to grow thicker. If you want the tree to grow tall do not cut the top leader, just shape the sides. The best time to shear is after a new growth spurt finishes and the new growth begins to mature. Shearing twice a year is sufficient. To keep your trees at a desired height will require cutting the central leader and then shearing all outside branches. This will control the trees size for many years, but eventually may get to large to keep at a smaller size.

1 year ago ·
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