Brown Turkey Fig -

(Ficus carica 'Brown Turkey')

Trees


Other Common Names: Common Fig, Edible Fig
Family: Moraceae Genus: Ficus Species: carica Cultivar: 'Brown Turkey'
Brown Turkey FigBrown Turkey Fig
Gardenality.com Planted · 9 years ago
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Feeding
When planting a fig tree, do not apply fertilizer at planting time. When new growth begins to emerge, and rain or irrigation settles the soil, apply a granulated organic fertilizer, or ammonium sulphate. Generally, two cups of fertilizer a year split into 3 to 4 applications should be sufficient, or follow rates recommended on label. Spread the fertilizer evenly over a circle 18" in diameter with the Fig plant in the center. Repeat this same fertilization process in March and July of the second year spreading twice as much fertilizer as the year before over a circle 24" in diameter with the fig plant in the center. Continue to increase the amount of fertilizer applied yearly until the bushes are 8-10 feet tall. Spread the fertilizer evenly under and around the branches. Water the plants throughout the growing season when rainfall is not adequate. Irrigation of young plants is especially important during the first season or two. Always keep a sufficient layer of much around your fig trees to control competition from weeds and help retain moisture.

6 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Planting
The ideal site to plant a Brown Turkey Fig tree will offer full sun, and an eastern or southern exposure alongside a home, wall or other structure to provide protection from prevailing winds and late frosts during winter. Fig trees will grow in average soil mixed with compost, but do not add manure-based soil amendments. Figs are not heavy feeders, and over fertilization results in lush leaf growth at the expense of fig production.

To plant a fig tree, dig a hole no deeper than the root ball and two to three times the width of the root ball and fill it with water. If the hole drains within a few hours, you have good drainage. If the water is still standing 12 hours later, improve the drainage in your bed, perhaps by establishing a raised bed or mound. Turn and break up the soil removed from the planting hole. If the native soil is dense, compacted or heavy clay mix in a good organic compost or soil amendment at a 30/70 ratio with the soil removed from the hole. Remove your plant from its container and carefully but firmly loosen the roots around the exterior of the root ball. Set the plant into the hole you've prepared, making sure the top of the root ball is slightly above the soil level to allow for settling. Pull your backfill soil mixture around the root ball in the hole, tamping as you go to remove air pockets. Then water thoroughly and cover with a one to two-inch layer of mulch.

5 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Pruning
Fig trees can be left alone to grow naturally or trained to grow as a large shrub or mid-size trees of various shapes. There are specific techniques fig tree farmers might use when pruning trees, however, follow the link below to find pruning guidelines for figs intended for home gardeners.

www.gardenality.com/Articles/360/How-To-Info/Pruning/How-To-Prune-A-Fig-Tree/default.html

5 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F · Comment About Problems
I haven't seen any serious insect or disease problems with figs, though deer might visit to steal a few fruits. I always plant figs in an eastern or southern exposure alongside a home, wall or other structure to provide protection from prevailing winds and late frosts during winter. An extra layer of shredded wood or straw mulch can help protect roots in case of a severe deep freeze.

5 years ago ·
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