Common Chickweed -

(Stellaria media)

Weeds


Other Common Names: Chickweed, Chickwort, Craches, Winterweed
Family: Caryophyllaceae Genus: Stellaria Species: media
Common Chickweed
Jennifer Fletcher Planted · 8 years ago
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Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
"The Encyclopedia of Edible Plants of North America: Nature's Green Feast" by Francois Couplan, Ph.D. has this to say about Chickweed: "S. media - introduced from Europe - is undoubtedly one of the best wild salads. Leaves and stems are tender and juicy with a delicate nutty flavor, and the plants are easy to gather in large quantities. Chickweed also makes an excellent potherb. The tiny seeds are also edible, but are tedious to gather."

In Japan, Common Chickweed is traditionally eaten in the spring with rice and other wild plants. It is also used for making tea. Chickweed is known to contain vitamin C, minerals, a fixed oil, and some saponin. It is tonic, diuretic, expectorant, and slightly laxative.

'Edible Wild Plants of Eastern North America' by Fernald & Kinsey has this to say about Chickweed: "The common Chickweed of gardens and damp, shaded dooryards is not to be despised as a mere weed, for many European authors are enthusiastic in their praises of it as a substitute for spinach. When boiled, it forms an excellent green vegetable resembling spinach in flavor, and is very wholesome."

Others speak of it as "having little taste, but as being a good padding to add bulk to other spinaches. Only the young, vigorously growing tips should be used, since the older bases of the plant become stringy with age."

8 years ago ·
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