Can Thailand Giant Elephant Ear Be Grown Or Propagated From Seed

Filed Under: Tropical Plants, Growing Basics, Advanced Growing, Techniques & Methods, Planting · Keywords: Propagate, Grow, Start, Thailand Giant, Elephant Ear, Seed · 1824 Views
Can I use the seed pods to start more plants?


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Answer #1 · John Heider's Answer · Hi Christina-Yes you can propagate this plant from seed. This plant will produce seed pods pretty regularly as it grows large enough. Beneath the spath (bloom), you should see the pod. In fact, many will have 5 or so spath flowers, each with a pod beneath it, all from a single leaf node. It will likely take several weeks for the pod to ripen and burst - but when it bursts open it's ready. It will look like it has exploded from the inside out.

Harvesting the seeds
1.) The first step is to remove the seed pod from the parent plant and extract the seeds by squeezing them out of the berries.

2.) Then soak them overnight in water for planting the next day. The seeds, which are very small (tomato seed size) can also be stored in a dry cool place for sometime if you're not looking to plant immediately.
Planting the Seeds

3.) If you are looking to plant immediately, have your seed tray ready with fine mix (preferably with a soil-less mix to avoid contamination; fungus can spread rapidly amongst seedlings).

4.) Spread them out on the surface and don't cover them with any soil.

5.) Mist them or keep them moist (a tray or container with a clear or translucent top will work to retain humidity, but you need to check them frequently to be sure they don't dry out - remember, they really like to be wet). They should germinate quickly.

Re-potting the seedlings

6.) The seedlings will need to be transplanted into larger 3-4" containers within a few months. You'll need to do this very carefully since the seedlings are very fragile at this point; they don't have much of a bulb at this point. I have found that by using a tray with a large hole in the bottom, I can poke a pencil through and push the plant out. Sometimes letting them dry out a little bit helps with this.

7.) Once you re-plant them in their larger container, be sure to keep them moist again so they can re-establish themselves. Once they grow a little larger, you can even set the pots in standing water and let it soak up the moisture through the bottom of the pot. These plants will thrive in water and will not drown.

8.) It won't be much longer before the 3-4" potted plants will need to be moved into larger 4-6" pots. They will begin to grow quite rapidly at this stage, especially if kept in a humid and well lit environment.

It won't be long before you can move them up to 1 gallon pots and then a few months later put them in the ground.

I have noted a link to an article that is the source for the information noted above. It will give you pictures also of this proceedure. You can copy and paste this link on the internet to go to the site.

http://www.hardytropicals.org/blog/entry/harvesting_seeds_from_colocasia_gigantea

Have fun and let us know how you make out.

John)



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Answer #2 · Debra Dirks's Answer · It seems to me that my plant grows one leaf but loses another at the same time. Is this normal? Also, what do you do with the stalk that the seed pod was on. My plant bloomed for the past two months but now has 12 seed pods that have not burst yet. The leaf that houses 6 seed pods appears to be dying and I am afraid to trim it. Thanks for any help you can give.)

Debra Dirks Answered by Debra Dirks 1 month, 2 weeks ago
Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F

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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
On young plants it might be normal to lose a leaf every time a new one emerges. Could be that the tubers are just not large enough to support more than one of it's giant leaves. Too, if there's not enough sun this could prohibit a full plant with many leaves. You can wait to trim leaves until they have gone dormant. If the plant is hardy in your area you can just cut the leaf stems back to about 6 inches or so above the ground after they've died back.

1 month, 2 weeks ago ·
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