Evergreen That Grows 30 Feet Tall And 6 Feet Wide

Filed Under: Trees · Keywords: Evergreen, 30 Feet Tall, Height, 6 Feet Wide, Width, Sun, Fast Growing · 959 Views
I have live in NYC and have a space that is 6' W x 20' L. It is between a concrete wall and a resin shed. I need an evergreen that will grow about 30' - 40' high but narrow to fit in a 6' area. I also have plenty of sunlight and no shade. I am concerned that the cryptomeria will grow too wide (unless I can trim it?) or will it just grow as wide as the space it is provided? If not, what type of evergreen would you suggest?


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Answer #1 · Brooks Wilson's Answer · Hi Linda,

Yoshino Cryptomeria grows to 15 feet or more in width at maturity. I would stay away from this plant.

Wintergreen Arborvitae Is the best I can think of. It grows to 25 feet in height and 6 feet in width. Moderate to fast growing, and likes full sun. Grows well in Hardiness Zones 4-9.

Hope this helps you in making your decision.

Brooks Wilson))


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Linda

Linda · Gardenality Seed · Zone 7A · 0° to 5° F
Thanks Brooks for you reply! Is there an arborvitae that will grow as high as 30-40 feet (vs the 25 feet) with a 6' width? Is the width something that I can trim the Cryptomeria to be 6' wide without damaging the evergreen?)

1 year ago ·
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Brooks Wilson

Brooks Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Once the Cryptomeria gets to about 20 feet in height it will be very difficult to keep trimmed. Then when it's 30 feet you will need a bucket truck to get high enough to trim it. Trimming a Cryptomeria may leave it very thin as well. I wouldn't do it. As these types of screen plants get larger they tend to shed inner foliage. When the outer foliage is pruned they will lose density. It's better to go with a plant that will naturally grow to 6 feet in width. The Wintergreen Arborvitae is listed to grow 25 feet in height. From my 33 years experience in the landscaping and retail nursery business I have realized that most all plants actually grow to a larger size that listed. I have seen Arborvitae that have outgrown their listed size by 10 feet or more. You can't stop a plant from growing. As it puts on new growth every year it will get larger.

1 year ago ·
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Linda

Linda · Gardenality Seed · Zone 7A · 0° to 5° F
Thank you so much for your input and feedback! It is really helpful and I will heed your advice and not plant it based on what you said. I was actually only thinking about pruning the bottom part of the tree (at most 10' high) to keep the tree from hitting the shed and just to allow the top to continue growing high and wide, but it sounds like it will just continue to grow regardless of the space. Thank you again for your prompt response!)

1 year ago ·
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Linda

Linda · Gardenality Seed · Zone 7A · 0° to 5° F
Hi Brooks,
I took your advice and planted wintergreens. It has been planted for about month now and the inside of the arborvitae is turning brown and shedding. I rustle the inside and it all just falls to the floor. Since it is fall season, I am assuming that this is normal, but how can I distinguish if this is normal shedding or if the arborvitae is dying?

Also I planted two of them in a very large pot (36" wide) and the wintergreen is about 7' tall. Will it survive living in the pot? I have heard mixed things that it will die after a year or that they can live in potted and left out in the winter as well?

1 year ago ·
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Answer #2 · Brooks Wilson's Answer · Hi Linda,

The inner foliage shedding is normal for this time of year. My guess is that your plants could be going through some transplant shock as well. Lack of water will also cause an Arborvitae to start yellowing in the center and dropping foliage. Make sure when you water to soak the plant well. It's a good idea to set the hose at the base of the plant and allow the water to trickle for 30 minutes to an hour. This will allow for the water to soak deep down to the bottom of the root ball. Now that the cooler season is upon us the Arborvitae should not need as much water. It's best to water heavy and then let it rest. If you are getting a good rain or two each week you shouldn't need to provide any extra water. If it's drought like I would deep soak about twice a week. Soon as winter sets in you should be done with watering unless there's an extended drought period.

Make sure as well that the plant was installed correctly. The top of the root ball should be at ground level or slightly above ground level with no soil on top of the root ball. It's ok to add mulch, but no soil covering the top of the root ball. Soil on top of the root ball can cause to much water retention and lead to root rot.

Arborvitae should do fine in containers as long as there is plenty of room for the roots to grow. If the root ball takes up the entire pot, at time of planting, it will be just a matter of time and the plant will begin to decline. Plants in containers always need room for root expansion or the plant will become root bound. Once root bound, signs of stress will begin. Plants in a pot will need slow release fertilizer as well. Slow release fertilizer releases a small amount of fertilizer with each rain or watering. The best slow release fertilizer that I know of is Dynamite or Osmocote.

Hope this helps you!

Brooks Wilson)



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