How To Neutralize Dog Urine On Plants

Filed Under: Animals and Rodents, Techniques & Methods · Keywords: How To, Neutralize, Dilute, Dog, Urine, Plants · 12223 Views
Hello, I recently did some planting in my backyard and my lovely sweet dogs have found great joy in peeing on a couple of them. I have installed a decorative fence and now would like to know if there is something I can put around them to neutralize the issue. I know ph balance and all that plays a role in healthy plants so was wondering what I can do.

I have read to use lime but wanted to ask you guys to get your input and direction.

Thank you!!!!!!
Jennifer Farley


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Answer #2 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Jennifer-Always having dogs, my best friends, the peeing problem is something I always had to live with. Most of my problem was with spots in the lawn burning. Like Brent said it is the nitrates in the urine that burn plants when in high concentrations. If you notice burnt spots in a lawn the outer edge of the burnt spot is usually a nice dark green color. This is because the concentration of nitrogen is less on the outside of the affected area and has acted as a fertilizer instead of a higher concentration that will burn. If we could keep the concentration of nitrates in our dogs urine low it may be good for some plants.

I have had some really smart dogs, but training them to pee a little here and there or to pee only on the plants that need a more acidic soil would be a futile effort. I don't think even the Dog Wisperer could do this. I have a neighbor that was able to train his dog to always go in one place in the yard. Sometimes you will find your dog has picked one specific spot he or she uses more than another. This one spot may be better than many spots all over the garden. When he goes in this spot you might make a big deal over this action and reward him. If your dog is still young you might take him to a specific spot in the yard and wait for him to do his thing. After a few times of being rewarded he may go there much of the time just to get the treat. I realize if he or she is an outdoor dog it is hard to do this training. Its always a good idea to have a few water dishes around. The more water available to my dogs both inside and outdoors the more water they seem to drink. This is not only good for your dog keeping them hydrated, but helps to dilute the level of urea in their urine. My wife has tried every home remedy including adding tomato juice to the dogs diet, but this sometimes is not good for their stomach. Supposedly the pet stores have products you can add to their food, but I would never add anything to my animals food that isn't natural for them to eat. I love my animals to much to change what is natural for them.

Peeing on things of course is natural for most dogs. This is natures way they are able to mark there territory. They are telling everone this is mine and you better stay away. Because your plantings are new they may feel they need to be marked and may not continue to this all the time in this spot. Maybe a loud "NO" and then a treat when they leave will work. Its funny how our animals, best friends, can read our minds so well, but we can't seem to read theirs as well as we would like at times.

I guess because my dogs enjoyed being everwhere I am in the yard I don't like hearing fences have to be put up to keep them out. Good luck and besides the peeing hopefully you both enjoy being in the garden together. My dogs were my best gardening buddies.

John)


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Jennifer Farley

Jennifer Farley · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Hi John. Thank you for your response. I have a total of 8 dogs 5 are big dogs and live outdoor except for bedtime. They are just a hodge podge of breeds. Best dogs ever. I have no intentions of trying to train them to go in a certain spot cause I would be expecting the impossible. They too are my best friends and I have read that tomato juice works and the stuff at the pet store works. I agree with you about giving them things that are not natural or that change their ph can cause bladder stones so I would much rather buy new plants than hurt them. I only put up a small fence around the one island in hopes it would deter them from walking all through it and peeing there. Time will tell. Thanks again :)

6 years ago ·
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Answer #1 · Gardenality.com's Answer · Hi Jennifer - I have two dogs as well. The boy dog pees on just about every plant in the back yard. He's a chihuahua so the amounts of urine aren't much and the irrigation system helps dilute it so haven't had a big problem.

When it comes to dog urine effecting plants or lawn grasses, it's not so much a pH issue as it is a nitrogen issue. Dog urine contains nitrogen, and the larger the dog the more of it they can spill on plants. It acts as a strong "fertilizer" that can burn plants when applied too heavily. So it's the repetitive urination on the plants and the excessive amounts of nitrogen that can cause damage to plants.

Outside of training dogs to avoid urinating on plants or diluting the urine with water, Im not aware of any other remedies that actually work. That being said, excessive amounts of dog urine can cause soil to become more acidic. Some plants like more acidic soil while others don't. If the plants your dogs are urinating on prefer a neutral or alkaline soil you might want to have your soil tested and apply lime if the soil is too acidic.

Most of the Plant Files in Gardenality show the pH that a specific plant thrives in. To find a Plant File for a specific plant simply type one word of the name of the plant in the search at the top of this or any other page in Gardeanlity. For example, if you were looking for Embers Encore Azalea, you could type in "embers", "encore" or "azalea."

Here's a link to an article that provides info on soil pH and how it can be adjusted:

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/984/How-To-Info/Growing-Basics/What-Is-Soil-pH-And-How-To-Adjust-It/default.html

Hope this info was helpful. Let us know if you need more details or have any other questions.

Brent)


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Jennifer Farley

Jennifer Farley · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Thank you very much!!! I have been rinsing them off daily and hoping the fence will help. I will do the research about the acid level for the different plants I have and go from there.

6 years ago ·
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Jennifer Farley

Jennifer Farley · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
I failed to ask one important question. Since the urine has burned the plant I cut it back and wasn't sure if it is a lost cause and i just need to replace the plants or if it will eventually grow back??

6 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
That's a good question about removing the damaged leaves. Any time there are damaged or diseased leaves on a plant it's good to cut them off. Otherwise, decay or disease can spread to other parts of the plant. Pruning also can help to stimulate new growth. Lets hope your plants will grow back. Give them at least a month or so to respond.

6 years ago ·
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