How Toxic Is Ascot Rainbow Euphorbia To Pets And People?

Filed Under: Perennial Plants, Garden Cautions · Keywords: Is, Ascot Rainbow, Euphorbia, Toxic, Poisonous · 6375 Views
Is this variety's sap toxic and what type of shedding does it have. I want to place it around my pool but concerned about the leaves and flowers or sap dropping off into my pool.


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Answer #2 · Gardenality.com's Answer · I have several varieties of Euphorbia growing in my landscape, including Ascot Rainbow, which is a favorite. I even have one growing in the fenced in backyard where my dogs play. Have had no problems with it. That being said, as John has pointed out, the sap is toxic and can cause some major irritation when it comes into contact with the skin or eyes. As John mentioned, if there will be children running around and playing in the area, stepping on and crushing the stems of the plant, this could be a problem. In this case, I might consider going with sedums and/or other types of succulents or drought tolerant plants known to be leas toxic. As for the sap getting into the pool water...this probably wouldn't happen unless somehow fresh cut stems found their way into the pool.

I always make sure to wear gloves when giving Euphorbia their once a year pruning, after the blooms have faded in late winter or spring. You definitely don't want that sap on your skin. Just be careful when handling it. I always am and have never got a drop on my skin. If so, I would quickly and thoroughly wash it off.

Let us know if you need some suggestions for other good plants that have low water needs. If so, provide us with your USDA Zone or city and state.)



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Answer #1 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Stephanie-The Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow' is considered a poisonous plant. It is suggested to use caution when handling the Euphorbias. Gloves and long sleeved shirts will help to keep the sap from touching the skin. The sap can be an eye and skin irritant. All parts of this plant are poisonous if ingested. You would want to be careful planting this plant anywhere you feel small children or pets may play or want to handle it. The ASPCA noted clinical signs of the plants toxin as being irritating to the mouth and stomach, sometimes causing vomiting, but felt it was generally over-rated in toxicity. Many animals naturally sense plants that are toxic to them and stay clear of these. The plant is noted as being resistant to deer and many small animals.

This plant is a perennial evergreen in hardiness zones 7 to 10. In cooler climates it can lose some of its leaves but nothing if falling into a pool that would harm the condition of pool water making it harmful. Many plants are considered toxic and most we would use in our gardens only require a little caution against eye and skin irritation. For safety reasons it is always wise to wear gloves when working in the garden. This alone is normally all the protection needed when planting, removing, or pruning your plants.

This Euphorbia is such a beautiful plant that its toxicity would not keep me from using it throughout my gardens. Like I said, only if you feel children or pets may handle this plant would be the only reason for planting it in a protected area from them.
I'm assuming when you said pool you were referring to a swimming pool. If this pool or pond contains fish you would not want to plant the Euphorbia too close to these as the sap in this plant is highly toxic to fish.

Hopefully this has helped.

John)



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Answer #4 · Stephanie VanGossen's Answer · Thank you Brent. I appreciate the time and effort you put into this. I will review the list and see if any of these will work for the atmosphere I am trying to create.)



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Answer #3 · Stephanie VanGossen's Answer · Thanks for the information. It is a swimming pool. I am looking for plants to place around the back side of the pool that have a bit of a tropical flare. I'm in zone 8A-8b. The plants can be limited in my zone for that look. We are just slightly too cool and then slightly too warm for a lot of them. This plant could easily carry the look with some sago palms around them. The color, leaf shape and the growth pattern is what attracted me to it.
I have a dog and a 5 yr old that will have open access to the area. I guess it wouldn't be wise to use them.)


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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Do you definitely want plants with low water needs...or can you use plants that have average water needs? Reason I ask is that there are quite a few hardy, tropical-looking plants, but some require more water, especially if there's a drought. Let me know and I'll put together a list for you.

6 years ago ·
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Stephanie VanGossen

Stephanie VanGossen · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
I am not specifically looking for low water plants. Just low maintenance plants. Otherwise they will die. I am very busy and they will get neglected. I have a sprinkler system that can attend to their water needs.

6 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Here's a list of plants you might want to consider that are hardy perennials in zone 8 and will add that tropical look around your pool. Most are fairly low maintenance.

Elephant Ears (Diamond Head is my personal favorite but there are many others)

Yucca (Color Guard is nice though it does have points on the ends of the leaves)

Mexican Petunia (Ruellia 'Purple Showers is my favorite but the dwarfs are nice as well)

Canna Lilies (Bengal Tiger "Pretoria" is a favorite)

Banana Tree (Japanese Fiber is the hardiest)

Indian Hawthorne

Purple Pixie Loropetalum

Tea Olive

Mojo Pittosporum

Woodlanders Bottlebrush

Iceplant (Delosperma cooperi)

Palms (European Fan, Windmill, Pindo)

Hardy Hibiscus

Sedums (Autumn Joy and the low growers)

Ornamental Grasses (Muhly, Miscanthus 'Adagio' and 'Nova', Pennisetum 'Moudry' are some favorites)

Hope this list was helpful.

6 years ago ·
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Stephanie VanGossen

Stephanie VanGossen · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Brent,
Thank you for the time and effort that you put into gathering this information for me. I will review the list and see if any of these choices will fit my needs. I wish I could post a picture on here to show y'all what the area looks like currently.

6 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
If you have a picture(s) you can upload them to this question using the 'Upload A Picture' link to the right of your name in your original question. The link is right next to the 'Edit your question' link.

6 years ago ·
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