Flowering Plants That Are Good To Attract Bees And Butterflies In A Pollinator Garden

Filed Under: Perennial Plants, Insects, Wildlife Habitats · Keywords: Plants, Flowers, Shrubs, Trees, Attract, Bees, Honeybees, Butterflies, Pollinators, Garden · 1420 Views
I would like to start a Garden geared toward feeding Pollinators especially Honey Bees, and I was wondering if anyone had any tips on where to start? what plants would be most beneficial. Thanks


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Answer #1 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Michelle-There are several plants that will attract bees and butterflies more so than others. Bees are basically looking for flowers that produce a lot of nectar and pollen as nectar loaded with sugars is their main source of energy and the pollen provides their ballanced diet of proteins and fats. As long as you have a constant supply of flowers (food) all season long the bees and butterflies with visit continually spring, summer, and into fall. Bees favor sunny spots over shade and areas that get very little wind. The largest variety of bees favor those plants that have single flowers over double blooms as it is easier for their short tongues to collect the nectar and pollen from. Butterflies and other bees will enjoy both single and double flowers. Chosing several colors of flowers over just a few will also help to attract more pollinators. Colors that seem particularly attractive to bees and butterflies are blue, purple, violet, white, and yellow. I have never paid attention to what color actually draws more bees in my garden but all of the bright colored annuals are always visited.

I noted below a list of Pollinator plants that will attract bees and butterflies in the Spring, Summer, and Fall. Depending on your location, hardiness zone, some bloom times may vary a little. I also noted a few links to articles in Gardenality that may be of interest to you and helpful in creating a Butterfly Garden (Pollinator Garden) and one that would attract Bees also. These articles will also give you some additional Pollinator Plants that may not be listed below. You can copy and paste these plant names under the plants tab above to search and find the plant file in Gardenality that will give you the plants picture and characteristics.

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/371/Garden-Types/Theme-Gardens/Planning-and-Planting-A-Butterfly-Garden/default.html

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/373/Garden-Types/Theme-Gardens/Suggested-Butterfly-Garden-Plants/default.html

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/764/Garden-Types/Flower-Gardens/Free-Butterfly-Garden-Designs/default.html

Spring EARLY BLOOMING POLLINATOR PLANTS

Baby Blue Eyes
California poppy
Chives
Clover
Dianthus
Larkspur
Lupine
Mustards
Osteospermum
Parsley
Poppy
Sweet Alyssum
Viola
Wallflower

Summer Blooming Pollinator Plants

Bachelor’s button
Basil
Black-eyed Susan
Blanketflower/ Gaillardia
Butterfly Flower/ Asclepias
Calendula
Coneflower/ Echinacea
Cosmos
Foxglove
Lavender
Monarda
Portulaca
Thyme
Coreopsis

Late Summer/Fall Blooming Pollinator Plants

Agastache
Amaranth
Cleome
Dahlia
Marigold
Salvia
Scabiosa
Sunflower
Zinnia

Please let me know if you have any other questions.

John)


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Michelle Pritchett

Michelle Pritchett · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Thank you very much! I cannot wait to get started.

5 years ago ·
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Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
You're very welcome. Hopefully you can upload some pictures of your new garden as it develops for us to see. Have a great Spring, John

5 years ago ·
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Answer #2 · Gardenality.com's Answer · Hi Michelle - This is a great question. Glad to see someone else who wants to attract bees! I'm raising mason bees on my property and have noticed a resurgence of honey bees in our area as well.

John provided a great list of plants. Here's a list of other types of plants that will attract bees:

FRUITS & VEGETABLES

Blackberries and other brambles
Cantaloupe
Cucumbers
Gourds
Cherry trees
Peppers
Pumpkins
Squash
Strawberries
Watermelons
Apples
Pears


HERBS

Bee Balm - There's new dwarfs and 'Jacob Cline' which is a mildew resistant taller red
Borage
Catnip
Catmint - I really like 'Walkers Low'...blooms all season
Coriander/Cilantro
Fennel
Lavender - SPanish lavender seems to be the hardiest in my area of Zone 8a in Georgia
Mints - Need shade and is best grown in containers unless you want it to spread as a groundcover
Rosemary
Sage
Thyme

SHRUBS

Hollies - Honeybees will swarm to the berry producing hollies that flower in spring
Mahonia
Winter Honeysuckle
Rhododendron
Rosa rugosa
Pieris
Cotoneaster
Privet - Ligustrum
Butterfly Bushes - Buddleia

TREES
Pussy Willow (Salix) - these are great trees for bees, as they provide an early source of pollen
Hazels - Corylus
Sycamore
Wild cherry (Prunus avium)
Hawthorne - Crataegus
Holly trees (Ilex)

If there isn't a body of water nearby, you might also want to consider providing the bees a water source. Just fill a low tray or dish with gravel. Place it near your bee garden and fill it with water to the top of the gravel. The bees will appreciate it!

Brent)



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