Are Primrose Plants Perennnial Or Annual?

Filed Under: Perennial Plants, Gardenality Help, Gardenality Ideas & Vision, Gardenality Plants, Gardenality Questions · Keywords: Primrose, Plants, Perennial, Annual · 1494 Views
I live in zone 6, we get freezes and sometimes snow and I'm wondering if the Primrose plants would be perennial in my zone? I recently bought some and would like to put them in the ground but I am hesitant because we could still freeze and have some nights under 32 degrees. I'm also wondering if they might winter over in pots? Also, do they need to be deadheaded? Any and all information would be helpful. I love them and would like to line a walkway by my garage with them, but not if they won't come back.


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3 Answers

Answer #1 · Josh Hersey's Answer · Hey Melinda, Great question they should defiantly be perennial for you. U. S. Department of Agriculture says hardiness is zone 2 thru 8. From personal experience make sure the stay in very moist soil or they will wilt. If you have them in containers or pots Check the pot often because primulas use a lot of water. Leaves and flowers wilt when the pot is too dry. Most species can handle a short freeze. Most primroses prefer cool, humid environments. Lastly, yes deadhead the flowers to encourage new growth.

You can also search Gardenality keyword primrose and there are many different varieties find yours and there is information to soak in.)


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Melinda Marsh

Melinda Marsh · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6A · -10° to -5° F
Fabulous information, I think they'd do well along our walkway next to our garage.

5 years ago ·
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Melinda Marsh

Melinda Marsh · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6A · -10° to -5° F
Would it be okay to put them in the ground now and then cover them when it gets below freezing?

5 years ago ·
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Melinda Marsh

Melinda Marsh · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6A · -10° to -5° F
How shall I deadhead the Primrose, just pinch of the bloom or cut back the stem? Also, I heard somewhere that they don't like their blooms to be watered on and that they should be watered below their blooms, is that true?

5 years ago ·
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Answer #2 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Melinda-Josh has given you a good answer. Thought I would add a little as I grow Primrose every year and wish I was in a cooler location so I could grow them as a perennial. The Primrose (Primula vulgaris) is a real favorite of mine as it is early color in my gardens during the winter and spring. Primrose can be grown as a perennial or an annual depending on your hardiness zone. In your zone like Josh said they possibly can be grown as a perennal if you only get a few nights of freezing cold no lower than the 20s. In Zone 6 you may get too many nights below freezing along with some snow. It is best to protect your primrose anytime the temperatures go below freezing with a sheet or blanket. If this is not possible over-wintering them in pots and kept in a well lite protected area can definitely be done. I live in a very warm climate and grow them as an annual as they won't do well in hot temperatures and warm soil. Any direct warm sunlight has always caused my plants to wilt quickly. They do best in light shade or morning sun only. Like Josh also said they like cool moist soil but it is important that the soil is not kept too wet. They need to be grown in a well draining soil or they can easily develop fungal diseases such as root rot if the soil is too wet or saturated.

Hope this has helped.

John)


Additional comments about this answer:

Melinda Marsh

Melinda Marsh · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6A · -10° to -5° F
Fabulous information, I think they'd do well along our walkway next to our garage.

5 years ago ·
1 Green Thumbs Up
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Melinda Marsh

Melinda Marsh · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6A · -10° to -5° F
Would it be okay to put them in the ground now and then cover them when it gets below freezing?

5 years ago ·
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Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
As crazy as this year's weather has been for many who knows what spring will bring. Normally most areas wouldn't be expecting much more freezing weather. I would probably plant them now as a few late frosts never seemed to hurt my plants. If things get crazy all of a sudden and you expect any harsh unforeseen cold weather covering should help them into Spring. Wow, I just realized today is the first day of Spring. Amazing how fast it creeps up on us. Hopefully you will upload a picture of your primrose for us to see once they have been in for awhile. Enjoy

5 years ago ·
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Melinda Marsh

Melinda Marsh · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6A · -10° to -5° F
Man, I love this feature, I'm so new to the whole new gardening thing and it's great to post a question and get knowledgeable, friendly answers, love it.

5 years ago ·
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Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
So glad you like the 'Ask Experts feature on the site. Hopefully you will brows around Gardenality and explore all the neat things you can do. Not only is the site very informative regarding all aspects of gardening but I have a lot of fun taking the quizzes and exploring other member gardens. I also like creating new gardens and using this feature to keep a log of my plants and their growth each year. I understand there are a lot of new things being added which will make this site even more of a great gardening tool for us all. As a member like you I no longer have to wait long periods of time to recieve an answer to my questions. Please ask any questions you may have and have fun looking around Gardenality. After a few years as a member there is still something I learn or find interesting every day visiting this site. Remember, we were all new to gardening at one time or another. Take Care, John

5 years ago ·
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Melinda Marsh

Melinda Marsh · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6A · -10° to -5° F
How shall I deadhead the Primrose, just pinch of the bloom or cut back the stem? Also, I heard somewhere that they don't like their blooms to be watered on and that they should be watered below their blooms, is that true?

5 years ago ·
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Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
I always dead head my primrose by pinching out the individual flowers in the clusters that have browned leaving those that still give color. After the whole cluster of flowers is spent I cut off the flower cluster at the base of its stem. I spend a lot of time when possible in my garden so I can do this tedious deadheading. Normally once the whole flower cluster is spent you can cut it off at the base of the stem. Deadheading deffinitely helps to encourage new flowering. Also any dead or yellowing older leaves should also be cut off at their base helping to promote new growth and a nicer maicured looking plant. It is always best to water your primrose at their base and not water overhead. Too much moisture in the crown can cause fungal disease. A few of mine get some sprinkler overspray from watering adjacent shrubs. These always look a little less healthy and foliage looks limp a lot of the time.

5 years ago ·
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Melinda Marsh

Melinda Marsh · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6A · -10° to -5° F
Great thanks so much. I put some in over the weekend and started the process get rid of some hedges in the rest of the bed where I'm putting all Primroses.

5 years ago ·
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Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
You're very welcome. I love this time of year working in the garden. Everything springs to life including myself. Got a few beds of annuals planted myself. Enjoy and please ask any questions you may have.

5 years ago ·
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Michelle Newman Answered by Michelle Newman 2 months, 3 weeks ago
Gardenality Sprout · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F


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