Is The Washington Palm The Same As The Washingtonia Palm?

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Is this Washington Palm the same as a Washingtonia Palm?


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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Hey Rafael - Can you upload a picture of this palm?

5 years ago ·
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Answer #1 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Rafael-The Washington Palm (Washingtonia robusta) is also known by other common names such as the Mexican Fan Palm and the Mexican Washingtonia. Not sure if this is the palm you are calling the Washington palm. I noted the link to the Washington robusta plant file for you to look at. There is another palm you may be thinking of that is very similar to the Mexican fan or Washington Palm that is commonly known as the California Palm (Washingtonia filifera), Desert Palm, Arizona Palm, or just Fan Palm also. This palm looks like the Washington Palm but doesn't get as tall and has a thicker trunk than the tall skinny trunk of the Washington palm. You can google both to see the differences in the two. Referring to a Washington palm I'm thinking is most likely referring to the Washingtonia Palm Washingtonia robusta.

http://www.gardenality.com/Plants/915/Palms-and-Cycads/Washington-Palm.html

Hope this has helped.

John)



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Answer #4 · Maple Tree's Answer · Rafael-The picture of your palm looks as though the palm is commonly known as the Mexican palm (Washingtonia robusta). I'm sure Brent or other members will see this picture and confirm this or possibly know of another palm I'm not aware of.)


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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
I agree, John. With the thicker trunk, it looks more like the Mexican Fan Palm.

5 years ago ·
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Answer #3 · Maple Tree's Answer · Rafael-It sound like you may have the Washingtonia filifera (California fan palm). They are slower growing and don't get the tall slender trunks of the robusta. They are definitely stockier looking and in my opinion a lot nicer palm for our landscaping. I have to laugh at times looking at the Mexican Fan Palms lining the old streets here in So. Calif.. Unless you are several miles away or looking straight up about 80 feet you would never notice the beauty of this tree. The leaf stems of the filifera are not thorny and sharpe unlike the robusta. The filifera also has cottony thread comming off the leaf margins. This is shown on the picture I uploaded. I have only grown one at a home I had years ago but seeing a lot of them growing in California landscapes in the desert and along the coast it seems as long as they have a well draining soil they seem to adapt to dought or wet conditions. Mine palm got plenty of water as it was watered almost daily from garden and lawn watering. Ones established in the desert communities it most likely gets very little water even during the cooler months. As far as its growth rate it is definitely slower growing than the robusta and of course only gets about half as tall as the robusta which still takes years to get to their mature height.

John)


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Answer #2 · Rafael Flores's Answer · Thanks John. Mine has the thicker trunk but is only about 6 feet tall. It was already in the yard when I bought the house. I've been in it for 2 years and it sat empty for a year but it does not appear to grow very fast and I was told that it is supposedly a fast grower. I was also told that it does not require much water but I have seem them around town next to creeks and some actually growing in the creeks with water in there. I'm confused. :-()


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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
After looking at the picture it's still hard to say, but the thicker trunk makes me think it's a Mexican fan palm. These trees are quite drought tolerant when established and prefer a well-drained soil. If yours has been slow to grow it could be due to too much moisture? Dig a smal hole 6 inches deep or so a little ways out from the trunk to check for soil moisture. Fill the hole with water to see how long it takes to drain. If more than a 6 hours it's not draining good and steps might need to be taken to improve drainage, or the tree might have to be replanted at a higher level or relocated.

Fertilization and pruning are also very important. Wait to remove fans/fronds until they are completely dead. Fertilize with a specialty Palm Food. Your local nursery and garden center should have it in stock or be able to order it for you.

5 years ago ·
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Rafael Flores

Rafael Flores · Gardenality Stem · Zone 9B · 25° to 30° F
This Palm, along with other drought resistant plants are located in an area that hardly ever gets watered. The dirt is a weird, super, super hard type of clay I'm told. To give you an idea as to how hard it is, I have to water the ground several times before using a pick and it only penetrates about 1-2 inches and I have to water again and again. I have been in this house two years and it sat empty for a year. All of these trees and plants were here already when I bought it. I'll try that fertilizer you mentioned. Thanks.

5 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Sounds like that hard clay could be impeding normal growth? I'm not a palm pro, but we have clay soil where I'm at in Georgia and I always dig as large a hole as possible when planting a palm and add sand and gravel to the soil mix to provide good drainage. You might want to add some copious amounts of gypsum to try to soften the clay.

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