Magnolia Tree

Filed Under: Planting, Trees · Keywords: Hi, Planting, Magnolia, Tree, My, Hardiness, Sun, Question, Flowers, Trees, Fall, Care, Grow · 725 Views
Hi,
I'm interested in planting a Magnolia tree on my side yard. I live in USDA Hardiness zone 7a and the spot I want to plant the tree in gets plenty of sunlight. Here are my questions;

1. What is the biggest size of the Magnolia Tree that I can plant?
2. What is the best time to plant Magnolia?
3. Which variety of Magnolia would work best for my hardness zone. I'm looking for a full sized tree with the white saucer shaped flowers. I see a lot of those trees around me and in full bloom in Spring through Fall.
4. What care is required and how fast do these trees grow?

Thanks
Shefali


Rate It 1


Comment about this question »

5 Answers

Answer #4 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Shefali-The Tuscarora is a really nice crape myrtle and a somewhat newer Fauriei Hybrid. I love my crape myrtles but mine are older varieties for which I am fighting powdery mildew every year. These new hybrids are quite resistant to the powdery mildew. Its good to remember this tree can grow 15 to 20 feet tall and wide. Make sure you have room for planting several if they are in the same location. Crape myrtles are not heavy feeders and normally only need to be fertilized once a year in the spring with a slow release shrub and tree fertilizer. I would assume the growers have most likely fertilized these new plants. Crape myrtles need very little care once they get established. Deep watering is good in order to make sure the entire root ball is being moistened and not allow to dry out especially when this young. Deep watering is done by letting a hose run very slowly around the base of the tree so that the water soaks deeply. Sprinkler are not normally left on long enough for the water to soak inches below the surface during the summer months. You want to make sure the soil is never kept wet as this promotes fungal disease and root rot. Once the crape myrtle is established they will need very little water. Deep watering once a week should be fine. Just keep the soil moist but not wet or too dry. It actually won't take long for water to soak down far enough to moisten these young trees small root ball. When planting your trees you can make a mounding ring around the tree with some of the extra soil that was taken out of the hole. When deep watering just fill this ringed area with water and let it soak into the ground. I like using mulch around my trees for several reasons. It helps to keep the moisture in the soil longer during the warmer months, insulates the tree in the winter against any freezing temperatures, adds organic matter to the soil as it decomposes, and it really looks nice instead of any bare soil. When spreading your mulch make sure it is not put up against the trunks of the tree. Keep it at least 6 inches away from the trunk so that no moisture is kept against the trunk that may help to promote fungal diseases.

Not to bore you with a long answer and to help with many other questions you may have about the crape myrtle I have noted some links to articles in Gardenality. These articles will help you with the planting, pruning, watering, and fertilization of your trees. Some like to grow the crape myrtle as a large shrub and others like them grown as trees. I really like the looks of a multi-trunk tree but others like a single trunk. These articles with help you with the pruning of your tree so you can develop a tree or shrub that meets your desires. You can also find many of these articles by typing in 'crape myrtle' after clicking on the articles tab above. You can also type in Tuscarora in the search box above any page or click on the plants tab. When you get to the plant file for the Tuscarora you will find much of this information also. As a mulch around my trees I like to use bark nuggets but there are several types of mulch you can use. I also noted a few articles that will help you with this.

Hey, like it is said, There are no silly or stupid questions only those that are not asked. Please don't hesitate to ask any questions. Just click on the "Ask Experts" tab above. You would be surprised how much your question and the answer will help others to learn something they may not know. I couldn't count the questions I have asked and still do regarding all aspects of gardening. Its amazing the things I learn from others every day just by asking.

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/1024/How-To-Info/Planting/How-To-Plant-A-Crape-Myrtle-Tree/default.html

http://www.gardenality.com/Plants/213/Trees/Tuscarora-Crape-Myrtle.html

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/344/How-To-Info/Pruning/How-To-Prune-A-Crape-Myrtle-Tree/default.html

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/1032/How-To-Info/Fertilizing/How-To-Fertilize-a-Crape-Myrtle-Tree/default.html

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/981/Reviews/Product-Reviews/Is-Rubber-Mulch-Beneficial-In-Landscape-and-Gardens/default.html

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/910/Projects/Landscaping-Projects/Different-Types-Of-Landscape-and-Garden-Mulch/default.html

John)


Additional comments about this answer:

Shefali Arora

Shefali Arora · Gardenality Sprout · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Thank you once again John for taking the time to answer my questions. I am so glad I found you through this site. I am excited about the Crape Myrtles and look forward to enjoying a beautiful garden in the seasons to come.

3 years ago ·
1 Green Thumbs Up
· Unthumb

Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
You're very welcome. Don't forget, you can add a garden with pictures of the plants you are adding to your garden. Its a great way to keep track of the list of plants in your new gardens and exciting to see their growth each year. Others get ideas also from the pictures of all our members gardens. Let me know how things are going.

3 years ago ·
0 Green Thumbs Up

Comment about this answer »
Rate It 1

Answer #1 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Shefali-The magnolia tree you are seeing throughout your location is most likely the Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora). I believe this would be the most frequently planted large magnolia in your area (Durham, NC). This magnolia will normally reach a height of 40 to 50 feet. In perfect growing conditions they have been known to grow much taller.

You asked what is the largest size of magnolia tree you can plant. Are you wanting to know what variety will grow the largest or what is the largest size you can purchase and easily plant yourself? Using a tree service you can pretty much pick any size of tree you desire. I have seen mature trees transplanted by tree services. Some growers will have large boxed trees in 24 and 36 inch boxes that would still have to be handled and planted with plenty of help and equipment. The largest size most would be able to plant themselves with another to help would be a 15 gallon tree. Most nurseries will carry 3 and 5 gallon size trees which you can easily plant yourself.

There are several varieties of the magnolia that would do well in your location. Some have the same large white flower you desire. Depending on the size of the area you plan to plant your tree in will determine what variety would be best. I noted a link below to several magnolia varieties you may like to look at. The D. D. Blanchard Magnolia is one large variety that may be available in your location. One magnolia I really like is the Little Gem Magnolia. I have many of these trees growing in my community and are a wonderful medium size magnolia that grows to 30 feet tall and 15 feet wide. You might also want to check with your local quality nursery to find available varieties they have and know will do well in your location and fit within the area you want to plant. The growth rate of most magnolias will be approximately two feet during a growing season.

A container grown tree can be planted any time of the year. Spring and fall would be preferred planting times. I like planting trees and shrubs in the fall as this gives them more time to establish themselves before the warmer months giving them a better chance to withstand any transplant shock. I also noted a link to an article on how to plant a tree.

As far as caring for the magnolia they are easily maintained. As a young tree keep the soil around the base of the tree moist. You want to keep young trees well watered until they become established. After the first year in the ground you can fertilize with a slow-release shrub and tree fertilizer in the spring when the flower buds begin to swell. As a young tree very little pruning will need to be done other than cutting off any lower limbs if need be to allow room for planting and possible lawn or other maintenance.


http://www.gardenality.com/Search/#Tab=Plants&PageIndex=1&PageSize=10&PlantSearch=null&SortBy=undefined&SearchText=magnolia&Attributes=null

http://www.gardenality.com/Plants/234/Trees/Little-Gem-Magnolia.html

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/218/Plants/Shrubs/Fall-Is-The-Best-Time-To-Plant-Shrubs-and-Trees/Why-Fall-Is-The-Best-Time-To-Plant-Shrubs-and-Trees.html

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/280/How-To-Info/Planting/How-To-Plant-A-Tree/default.html

Please ask if you have any other questions.

John)



Comment about this answer »
Rate It 1

Answer #2 · Shefali Arora's Answer · John,

Thank you so much for taking the time to give me such a thorough answer to my questions. I am continually impressed with your knowledge of gardening.

Yes, I was looking to plant the Southern Magnolia with the big saucer shaped white flowers and was hoping to plant a 5-6 feet tall tree. not sure where I can find one but will check to see nurserys in my area. As per your suggestion, I think I should wait till next fall or if I plant one now and it would grow at least two feet this year then I could perhaps also plant a smaller one that is more easily available.

Thank you again for all of the links. It will definitely help me make a more informed choice.

-Shefali)


Additional comments about this answer:

Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
Shefali-You're very welcome. Glad I could help. It looks as though there are several nurseries and garden centers that should carry a few different sizes of the magnolia or at least be able to order one for you. One garden center I found was the Durham Garden Center. Of course I have no idea of their quality and service but it looked as though they may have just what you are looking for. I purchase a lot of quality plants here on the West Coast from Armstrong Nurseries. They have a few stores I understand in N.C. under the name Pike Nursery. The closest to you I believe is in Charlotte but you could call them for information. If you were to use an online source for a smaller size tree you could use Gardenerdirect.com. They have always been very helpful and have nice quality plants. If you would like to plant the magnolia now there should be no problem doing so in the spring. Let me know how you make out and please ask if you have any other questions.

3 years ago ·
1 Green Thumbs Up
· Unthumb


Comment about this answer »
Rate It 1

Answer #5 · Shefali Arora's Answer · Hi John,

So I went ahead and planted two "Saucer Magnolia" trees today. These are both about 10 feet tall and I have planted them in the North side of my yard which gets part sun and part shade. Of the two, I have planted one closer to a pillar (about 1.5 feet) from my porch. Would this be a problem later, when the tree grows bigger? Also, what care do these trees require and how regularly do they need to be watered ? (Also, after planting them today the temperatures have fallen into the 20'S tonight..should I be worried? (It is expected to get back into the 60s next week after a couple of days, cold spell.

I also looked at two varieties of Evergreens (Southern Magnolias) that I wish to plant. The ones I particularly liked were the DD blanchards and the Brackens Brown trees. Both these are available in about 10ft size. I have some questions as follows;
1. What is the main difference between the two, and which of the two would you recommend?
2. What care needs to be taken, if I plant them now?
3. How much will they grow per season?
4. How much should I typically expect to pay for planting of these trees? Each of these trees cost about $250.
5. Do I need to water the roots while planting, or after the planting is complete?

Thanks
shefali)


Additional comments about this answer:

Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
Hi Shefali-The Saucer Magnolia (Magnolia × soulangeana) is hardy to zone 4 so the colder temperatures most likely didn't harm the magnolias. Any time the weather has been warm the developing flower buds or any new foliage can be damaged by late freezing temperatures. This could affect the amount of flowering but overall the magnolias should be fine. These magnolias can be grown as a small tree or large shrub. Planting to close to your porch and pillar may be a problem in time. This magnolia can grow 20 feet tall and just as wide. These magnolias don't require a lot of care. They like to be planted in a well draining soil and kept moist but never too wet. The type of soil and amount of direct sunlight will determine how often they will need watering. Just make sure the soil is damp and not allowed to dry out.
Unfortunately I'm not a lot of help when it comes to different varieties of magnolia trees. From what I have learned both the DD Blanchrd and Bracken's Brown Beauty can grow to 40 feet and higher. The DD Blanchard evidently has the largest leaves of all the magnolias and its flower is large and cup shaped where the others have a more open flower. They both have a medium growth rate which is approximately 1 to 2 feet during a growing season. It would be best to acquire information on both these magnolias from your local quality nursery or garden center (not the big box stores). They should be able to explain the differences in these varieties and which may do better in your location. One magnolia I am acquainted with is the Little Gem Magnolia. We have several in our community that only grow to 25 feet with a spread of 10 to 15 feet. They are a smaller variety and are evergreen. These seem to blossom most of the summer months. If you don't feel you have the room for the larger growing magnolias the Little Gen may be worth looking at. Planting in the spring is fine. Again you mainly want to keep them consistantly moist but never too wet or dry. The price to plant a tree can vary drastically depending on your location. I'm amazed at times at the difference in cost in other parts of the country compared to mine. Again you can find this out by talking with your local nursery. If you have a gardener or a neighbor that uses a gardening service they many times are more reasonably priced than the nurseries or tree service companies. My neighbors gardeners are always willing to plant for others when they are in the area. If the soil is dry I would water so that it is moist when planting. If moist, just make sure the soil is backfilled around the root ball so that there is no air pockets left around the roots. After planting water well to settle the soil around the roots making sure the entire root ball to its depth is moistened.

3 years ago ·
1 Green Thumbs Up
· Unthumb


Comment about this answer »
Rate It 0

Answer #3 · Shefali Arora's Answer · Hi Again John,
I ordered 4 carpe myrtles yesterday from the Crepe Myrtle Guy. His website said they would be 3 feet tall, however what arrived is barely 12 inches. I went ahead and planted them, hoping they will grow really fast. What should I expect from these? and what is it that I need to do take best care of them. Attaching some picutres of what they look like and what they are supposed to eventually look like.

I had one more question, is Mulch required when planting trees? What are the Pros and cons of using mulch? I beleive these trees need to be deep root watered once a week and fed every 3 weeks. How exactly do you deep root water trees? I hope this does not sound too silly a question, but I have always wanted to know the answer from someone who knows all about planting trees ;-))


Answer Images:
Picture about Magnolia Tree Picture about Magnolia Tree


Comment about this answer »
Rate It 0

Post An Answer To This Question:



Can't find your answer? Click here to ask your question.

Read Tips On How To Give A Great Answer

Click here to learn how to give a great answer »


Updates

View All My Gardenaltiy Updates »