Double Delight Looks Weird

Filed Under: Insects, Insects · Keywords: Rose bush, long brownish branches · 469 Views
I bought a 'Double Delight' last year which bloomed nicely all summer, and looked OK this spring until the end of May when I saw that a couple of new branches looked weird - they were too long and a little brownish. However, the rest of the plant seemed OK, only the leaves were covered with little holes, however I couldn't see any insects. Now these new long branches look almost all green, and have flower buds, no curliness or fuzziness (so, I don't think it's RRD), but the first flower on the old branch looks weird (see picture). We've had too much rain this spring, so I sprayed the plant with Neem oil periodically. I never saw any insects on the plant, what could be the reason for these new long branches and the problem with the flower?


Question Images:
Picture about Double Delight Looks Weird Picture about Double Delight Looks Weird Picture about Double Delight Looks Weird Picture about Double Delight Looks Weird

Rate It 1


Comment about this question »

2 Answers

Answer #2 · Natalya's Answer · Hi John. Thanks so much for your quick response. I looked at the plant thoroughly but it doesn’t seem to me that these new skinny branches are growing from below the bud union (I attach new pictures). They just look like new growth, but why are they so leggy? We’ve got a lot of rain this spring, - maybe because of that? As you can see from the first picture, these new branches look ugly. Should I get rid of them, anyway? There are a couple of flower buds on top of them, - maybe I should wait and see what kind of flowers they produce? But what happened to the first flower that opened on one of the old branches - why did it look sick? Like a little burnt on one side, and not even fully opened but wilted. And I don’t see any other buds on the old branches. I do use Neem oil regularly, so, apparently, it doesn’t help against these beetles or saw fly larvae. I will ask for lady bugs and praying mantis in our garden centers today. Thank you, again, John, I will keep you posted.)


Answer Images:
Picture about Double Delight Looks Weird Picture about Double Delight Looks Weird Picture about Double Delight Looks Weird Picture about Double Delight Looks Weird

Additional comments about this answer:

Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
I believe these are sucker growth with the difference in the amount of thorns on the new growth compared to the older stems. I would wait and see what the flowers on this growth look like and this should tell us whether they are from the plant you purchased or from the root stock. Let me know how they develop.

2 years ago ·
0 Green Thumbs Up

Comment about this answer »
Rate It 0

Answer #1 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Natalya-It looks as though the tall quick growing stems you are seeing is sucker growth. Many roses are grafted onto a rootstock which is not actually the variety of rose you purchased. The rose variety you purchased was made by budding or grafting it onto another variety of rose which was used as the rootstock. Sucker growth can sprout from this rootstock which would develop from below the grafted area. The spot where the rose you purchased was grafted is called the "Bud Union" and is a knot just above the roots where the canes grow out of. Any shoots sprouting from below this knot are suckers growing from the root stock of the rose your variety was grafted onto. Suckers are fast growing with the foliage many times being lighter green in color than the other foliage. The flower will also be different than the variety you purchased. Because this sucker growth sprouts from below the bud union it sucks any nutrients up before they can get to the rose variety you purchased. This is why they are called "suckers"? If they are allowed to grow they can kill the rose variety you purchased with only the type of rose that was used for the rootstock left to survive. If you follow these fast growing suckers down to their origin you will most likely find they are sprouting from below the knot or grafted area. Cut this sucker growth off right at the point where it is growing from the rootstock. The holes I see in the leaves may be a type of beetle or saw fly larvae which at times may be hard to see before actually seeing the damage they caused. Aphids can also be a problem on roses. I only use neem oil in the garden as it is safe to use and will not harm the benefincial insects. If the infestation gets worse you can use an insecticide such as sevin but this is normally not needed. This time of year many nurseries or garden centers will have lady bugs and or praying mantis for sale. I add several hundred praying mantis to my gardens every spring which helps a lot in controlling any problems with these insects.

Let me know what you find and please don't hesitate to ask any other questions you may have.

John)


Additional comments about this answer:

Natalya

Natalya · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6B · -5° to 0° F
Hi John, I am attaching a picture of the first bud that opened - it looks exactly like 'Double Delight', however, it’s not as gorgeous (yet?) as the flowers I had last year, - the edges of the petals are a little bit curled and yellowish/dry, and the flower is tight and not completely opened (the first flower on this plant (on one of the old branches) also had brownish edges and did not open at all and wilted immediately). Look how leggy the new branches (with more flower buds), - what could be the reason? Maybe too much rain?

2 years ago ·
0 Green Thumbs Up
Natalya

Natalya · Gardenality Seedling · Zone 6B · -5° to 0° F
I cannot attach the picture to my comment, should I post a new answer to be able to upload a picture?

2 years ago ·
0 Green Thumbs Up

Comment about this answer »
Rate It 0

Post An Answer To This Question:



Can't find your answer? Click here to ask your question.

Read Tips On How To Give A Great Answer

Click here to learn how to give a great answer »


Updates

View All My Gardenaltiy Updates »