Good Shrubs For East Side Of Home In Zone 7B

Filed Under: Shrubs, Landscaping · Keywords: Good, Evergreen, Foundation, Plants, Shrubs, East, Side, Home, Zone 7b · 2702 Views
I'm replacing some foundation plants and looking for good suggestions. I'm considering Dwarf Yedda Hawthorn or maybe some type of mountain laurel. I'm in zone 7B and prefer something that is evergreen and will not exceed 4 feet in height with minimal pruning. Any suggestions???


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Brent Wilson

Brent Wilson · Gardenality Administrator · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Hi Jaclyn - How much sun does the area you intend to plant these shrubs receive? Also, is the soil well-drained or is it consistently damp, moist or wet? It's not necessary, but if you can, upload a picture of the area you want to plant the shrubs. This might help me hone in on what plant(s) might work best to compliment your home. To upload a picture you have on your computer just click on the "Upload A Picture" link above (right next to the "Edit your question" link). if you can't upload a picture, just provide answers to the questions I asked and I'll be happy to provide you with some good choices. - Brent

2 years ago ·
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Answer #2 · Brent Wilson's Answer · Jaclyn - That's a good description of the area:-) Since it's on the east side it will get morning sun with afternoon shade. With that in mind, and the maximum 4 feet height and evergreen foliage, the following plants might be good considerations (in no certain order):

Encore Azaleas (most grow 3-4 feet in height)

Upright Rosemary

Carissa Holly

Dwarf Variegated or Dwarf Green Aucuba

Leprechaun Lecouthoe

Soft Caress Mahonia

Yewtopia Plum Yew

Winter Daphne

Gulf Stream Nandina

Frost Proof Gardenia

Eleanor Tabor Indian Hawthorne

Shishi Gashira Camellia (This is a dwarf)


You could also use the Yeddo Upright Hawthorne however these will require pruning at least once a year to keep the plant to four feet height, and to keep them dense and full. I have some planted on the side of my front porch that receive morning sun with afternoon shade. I've neglected to prune over the past few years and they've become quite leggy. Will cut them half way back next month (end of February) and hope they bush back out.

Hope this list helped. Let me know if you have any other questions.
Brent)


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Answer #1 · Jaclyn Collins's Answer · Hi Brent and thanks for your response. The area is on the East side of my house, and spans the area between the front stoop and the northeast corner of the house. It gets good morning sun without any other shading from trees or structures. The area has irrigation, so I have good control over the moisture of the area. I don't have a photo available right now, but I'll take and upload one as I can. Until then, I'll try to describe the area a little better. The area is a long rectangular area that is about 18 feet long and 4 feet wide. It is bordered on both ends by mature Hollywood junipers.

Originally the builder had planted gardenias (August beauty, I think) but I had a white fly epidemic that was very difficult to control so those have come out. I then planted rose creek abelias there, but while I love the plants, I don't like their form in that location. I think I would like to see something a little more upright in there.

Hope this is helpful. Again, thanks for offering to give this a think. Jaclyn)



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